Summit Information

Where are you on your Social Justice Journey?

K-12 teachers are uniquely poised to help students understand race and racism. Now is the time to be the change!

Join us for a virtual event on April 1 at 7pm. Whether you are new to the concept of social justice education, or a veteran of many years engaging in culturally sustaining pedagogy-this summit is for you. We will address a wide range of topics, such as what exactly is meant by the term “white privilege” and how can we create schools that are sites of anti-racism. There will be several break out rooms, each scaffolded to support you in your current stage of your social justice journey.

More good news, this event is FREE! Please bring a friend. Education is hard work, and social justice education is even more so. This summit hopes to be the first step in building a powerful online community to support teachers, staff, and school administrators as we work collectively to create a more just society through our schools.

Black Lives Matter Movement

The media coverage of the protests that resulted from the murders of black individuals at the hands of police officers has sparked greater awareness in our society. Communities are calling out for anti-racist education. Answer the call.

Anti-Racism must be the work of all teachers

Despite changing demographics among school age children, the teaching profession remains predominantly white. For the 2019-2020 school year, Pennsylvania had the least diverse teaching force in the nation-96% white only 4% teachers of color. White teachers can't rely on their colleagues of color to carry the burden of being the only ones who address race in their schools.

It is never too early to start talking about race

Young children are picking up on racial messages they are getting from society as early as two years of age(Hirschfeld, 2008). Sadly, children as young as two and a half have been observed using that racial information to make decisions about people, and use it as a reason to select playmates that look like themselves (Katz & Kofkin, 1997) or withhold toys from their peers (Van Ausdale & Feagin, 2001). Learn how to interrupt these early racist behaviors.